From the Desk of Alma Tuck: Braising Meat in a Dutch Oven

posted at article.wn.com Public Domain How to Cook With a Dutch Oven : How to Bake Dutch Oven Cinnamon Pecan Rolls Braising is a great way to turn an inexpensive, tough cut of meat into a delicious feast, and the technique is perfectly suited to Dutch oven cooking.

Season the meat with salt and pepper. Cover the bottom of the Dutch oven with oil, and heat the oil until it’s almost smoking. Cook the meat quickly, turning it often, until it’s brown on all sides.

Pour in liquid to reach the halfway point of the meat. For example, if you’re cooking a roast with a thickness of 3 inches, add about 1½ inches of liquid.

Nearly any liquid works fine, including water or canned broth. However, this is a chance to be creative. Braise the meat in apple cider or tomato juice, or a combination of liquids. Add a splash of beer, wine, whiskey, ketchup, or Worcestershire sauce. If you have vegetables such as potatoes or chunks of carrots or turnips, throw those in as well.

Cover the Dutch oven and put it over low heat so the liquid simmers gently. Check the meat occasionally and add liquid to replace any that evaporates. Cooking time varies depending on the level of heat and the thickness of the meat, and a large roast may take as long as five or six hours. When the meat is so tender it falls apart when you poke it with a fork, it’s ready to eat.

A busy businessman, entrepreneur, and volunteer, Alma Tuck enjoys a number of activities in his free time, including aviation, ham radio, and music. Weekends often find him outdoors, where he likes hiking and snowmobiling.

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